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Excerpt is dedicated to photography and the moving image. Based in Australia, covering the world.

 

Filtering by Tag: Talia Smith

THANK YOU NEW ZEALAND PHOTOGRAPHERS!

Talia Smith & Christine McFetridge curated an exceptionally nuanced selection of New Zealand photographers for The Weather Was Ideal and Excerpt Magazine wishes to thank them for sharing this project with the Excerpt audience.

Thank you to the photographers Blair Barclay, Natasha Cantwell, Harry Culy, Sam Dow, Raewyn Gilkes, Geoffrey Heath, Leilani Heather, Shelley Jacobson, Anton Maurer, Christine McFetridge, Solomon Mortimer, Talia Smith, Abby Storey, Anita Tótha & Tim J. Veling for sharing their work as part of The Weather Was Ideal. It is clear that current photographic work within New Zealand has depths and resonance that is far reaching.

We want to continue to make strong connections between Excerpt Magazine and New Zealand photo-based practice and in the coming months will be sharing more work. Christine McFetridge who is currently based in Melbourne, and Talia Smith, who is based in Auckland until July - December 2014 when she will be guest curating at Gaffa in Sydney, are strengthening cross-currents between the Australian and New Zealand photography communities both as photographers and curators and this is so exciting to see. 

THANK YOU!

Photograph by Tim J. Veling

Photograph by Tim J. Veling

Shelley Jacobson - The weather was ideal

NEW ZEALAND PHOTOGRAPHY CURATED BY
CHRISTINE MCFETRIDGE AND TALIA SMITH

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Surface Expression (2013-14), a new body of work by Shelley Jacobson, focuses on the impact of industrialisation on three geothermal sites.

There are always two sides to every story and Jacobson explores the potential downside of technological advancements that we have made. She uses the landscape to tell this story, specifically sites within the Wairakei geothermal system. New Zealand is known for its geothermal tourist spots being natural wonders but as her series of work documents, the natural is now turning into the manmade.

"Namely the Wairakei geothermal power station borefield; the manmade geyser at the adjacent ‘Wairakei Terraces’ walkway, which operates using water from the bore field; the nearby ‘Craters of the Moon’ walkway, which developed geologically as a result of changing pressure in the Wairakei system post-drilling. These three interlinked sites speak of the impact of industrial activity, but also act as sites of drama and spectacle."

Jacobson's work is thoughtful and interesting, engaging viewers with images that are as much of a wonder as the natural sites themselves. Social constructs and ideals around place and landmarks through not just New Zealand but also internationally (her series of work titled Sea of Trees made in Japan, is an absolute standout) are the main drive for her work. There is a real strength to each project with many layers of experimentation and research having been taken during the process.

New Zealand is heavily promoted as 'Clean and Green' and a place that features awe inspiring natural beauty; to some extent this statement is true, but as Jacobsen's work examines perhaps now is not the time to become complacent about such a statement. Now is the time that we should take care in making sure that this ever advancing world doesn't make these beautiful, naturally occurring sites anything but a memory.

Now is the time we question what we want future generations to experience firsthand.

- Talia Smith

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This post is part of The weather was ideal project, a series of posts about New Zealand photography curated by Christine McFetridge and Talia Smith.

Solomon Mortimer - The weather was ideal

NEW ZEALAND PHOTOGRAPHY CURATED BY
CHRISTINE MCFETRIDGE AND TALIA SMITH

Kosher butcher, 2013

Kosher butcher, 2013

'But it's getting better now.
He found it in him to forgive.
He walked the city,
And he found a place to live,
In a half-way house,
Half-way down Dominion Road.'
- The Mutton Birds

Cities are defined by their iconic stretches of road. They're features of a city we remember long after we've left it behind. These are the sort of places communities and cultures congregate; and local industry thrives. We write songs and stories about them. Auckland's Dominion Road is one of these places. It's a busy road used daily by thousands of commuters, but its locals make the place what it is. Solomon Mortimer's project Dominion Road documents these characters, and their setting, as proposed alterations to the road infrastructure come into effect and change a landscape unaltered for eighty years.

'With the alterations of Dominion Road beginning this year, I was given the opportunity to collect the stories and memories of those whose nostalgic remnants of a lifetime were about to be demolished. Working with an oral historian, and Auckland City Libraries, I recorded for this project an account of the road as it was, and has been for the last eighty years (no one I could find with ties to the road was older than that).'

Solomon plays the 'role of the archivist with a camera.' He introduces us to figures; new, but we've met them before. The gentleman reading his paper, local bakers and restauranteurs. The work is not time sensitive in an aesthetic sense and just as we relate to the images now, so too will others in fifty years time. 

These men and women use their hands to engage in a very physical way of life. They're salt of the Earth kind of individuals; quiet men and women who, like a road, make a place memorable to those passing through.

The project is now housed in the Sir George Grey Special Collection at the Auckland Central City Library.

- Christine McFetridge

56, 2013

56, 2013

Ta the Poet, 2013

Ta the Poet, 2013

Pride and Joy of an Auto-Mechanic, 2013

Pride and Joy of an Auto-Mechanic, 2013

Bulb replacement, 2013

Bulb replacement, 2013

Outdated investments, 2013

Outdated investments, 2013

Collection Day, 2013

Collection Day, 2013

Bolter at 10:27am, 2013

Bolter at 10:27am, 2013

Bakery dynasty, 2013

Bakery dynasty, 2013

Larry Woods the King of Wax, 2013

Larry Woods the King of Wax, 2013

Margaret, 2013

Margaret, 2013

Andrew Kenneth Mead, 2013

Andrew Kenneth Mead, 2013

Steelworks #1, 2013

Steelworks #1, 2013

The Foreman, 2013

The Foreman, 2013

Belview Reserve, 2013

Belview Reserve, 2013

This post is part of The weather was ideal project, a series of posts about New Zealand photography curated by Christine McFetridge and Talia Smith.

Anita Tótha - The weather was ideal

NEW ZEALAND PHOTOGRAPHY CURATED BY
CHRISTINE MCFETRIDGE AND TALIA SMITH

From the series   Unchartered

From the series Unchartered

The desolation and vastness of this ever-changing sculptural landscape creates a surreal, otherworldly environment to experience where nature takes over. Footprint trails erased, no trace left behind. The hostility of the elements forever transforms the terrain within hours, making it appear devoid of all human interaction.

The images taken in New Zealand (arguably the final frontier of the world) is where uncharted, unexplored territory still exists. Upon their arrival centuries ago, Maori and European colonisers have adapted to some of these foreign and unforgiving landscapes created by the Earth, on volcanoes, glacial lakes and geo-thermal areas, making what was first perceived as foreign and remote, familiar, by adapting to their 'new world' and surroundings.

- Anita Tótha

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Anita is currently based in Auckland, New Zealand and is co-founder of Tangent, a New Zealand contemporary photography collective. She runs the Auckland branch of The Photobook Club and is on the advisory panel of the Asia Pacific Photobook Archive.

This post is part of The weather was ideal project, a series of posts about New Zealand photography curated by Christine McFetridge and Talia Smith.

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